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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

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The effect of the More Active MuMs in Stirling trial on body composition and psychological well-being among postnatal women

Lee, Alyssa S and McInnes, Rhona J and Hughes, Adrienne R and Guthrie, Wendy and Jepson, Ruth (2016) The effect of the More Active MuMs in Stirling trial on body composition and psychological well-being among postnatal women. Journal of Pregnancy, 2016. ISSN 2090-2735

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Abstract

Introduction. Physical activity is important for health and well-being; however, rates of postnatal physical activity can be low.This paper reports the secondary outcomes of a trial aimed at increasing physical activity among postnatal women. Methods. More ActiveMuMs in Stirling (MAMMiS) was a randomised controlled trial testing the effect of physical activity consultation and pram walking group intervention among inactive postnatal women. Data were collected on postnatal weight, body composition, general well-being, and fatigue. Participants were also interviewed regarding motivations and perceived benefits of participating in the trial. Results. There was no significant effect of the intervention on any weight/body composition outcome or on general well-being at three or six months of follow-up. There was a significant but inconsistent difference in fatigue between groups. Qualitative data highlighted a number of perceived benefits to weight, body composition, and particularly well-being (including improved fatigue) which were not borne out by objective data. Discussion. The MAMMiS study found no impact of the physical activity intervention on body composition and psychological well-being and indicates that further research is required to identify successful approaches to increase physical activity and improve health and well-being among postnatal women.