Picture of athlete cycling

Open Access research with a real impact on health...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

Explore open research content by Physical Activity for Health...

Study for femto satellites using micro control moment gyroscope

Post, Mark and Bauer, Ralf and Li, Junquan and Lee, Regina (2016) Study for femto satellites using micro control moment gyroscope. In: 2016 IEEE Aerospace Conference. IEEE, New York, pp. 1-8. ISBN 9781479953806

[img]
Preview
Text (Post-etal-2016-study-for-femto-satellites-using-micro-control-moment-gyroscope)
Post_etal_2016_study_for_femto_satellites_using_micro_control_moment_gyroscope.pdf - Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Abstract— Femto-satellites can be used for distributed space missions that can require hundreds to thousands of satellites for real time, distributed, multi-point networks to accomplish remote sensing and science objectives. While suitable sensors are available using micro-electro-mechanical system technology, most femto-satellite designs have no attitude control capability due to the power and size constraints on attitude control actuators. A novel femto-satellite design that uses a micro-electro-mechanical system Control Moment Gyroscope is studied in this paper. We focus on the principal design, modelling, and discussion of the proposed Control Moment Gyroscope while detailing a controllable femto-satellite design that can make use of attitude control for simple sensing missions.