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Aesthetic of prosthetic devices : from medical equipment to a work of design

Sansoni, Stefania and Speer, Leslie and Wodehouse, Andrew and Buis, Adrianus (2016) Aesthetic of prosthetic devices : from medical equipment to a work of design. In: Emotional Engineering. Springer International Publishing AG, pp. 73-92. ISBN 9783319294322

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Abstract

Aesthetics of prosthesis design is a field of research investigating the visual aspect of the devices as a factor connected to the emotional impact in prosthetic users. In this chapter we present a revised concept of perception and use of prosthetic devices by offering a view of ‘creative product’ rather than ‘medical device’ only. Robotic-looking devices are proposed as a way of promoting a new and fresh perception of amputation and prosthetics, where ‘traditional’ uncovered or realis-tic devices are claimed not to respond with efficacy to the aesthetic requirements of a creative product. We aim to promote a vision for a change in the understand-ing of amputation - and disability in general - by transforming the concept of Dis-ability to Super-ability, and to propose the use of attractive-looking prosthetic forms for promoting this process.