Picture of person typing on laptop with programming code visible on the laptop screen

World class computing and information science research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

Explore

Eliciting engineering knowledge about reliability during design - lessons learnt from implementation

Hodge, R.J.J. and Evans, M. and Marshall, J. and Quigley, J.L. and Walls, L.A. (2001) Eliciting engineering knowledge about reliability during design - lessons learnt from implementation. Quality and Reliability Engineering International, 17 (3). pp. 169-179. ISSN 0748-8017

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

In electronic design the use of engineering knowledge and experience is considered important in understanding and estimating the reliability performance of complex systems. There are numerous methods proposed for eliciting this knowledge in order to ensure that the data collected are valid and reliable. In this paper we describe our experiences in implementing an elicitation process that aims to extract engineering knowledge about the impact of design changes on a new aerospace product that is a variant of an existing product. The elicitation procedures used will be outlined and the ways in which we evaluated their usefulness will be described. This research generated many useful insights from the engineers and facilitators involved in the elicitation exercise. This paper shares their perspectives on the gains and losses associated with the exercise and makes recommendations for enhancing future procedures based on the lessons learnt.