Picture of person typing on laptop with programming code visible on the laptop screen

World class computing and information science research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

Explore

Capturing sociality in the movement between frames : an illustration from leadership development

Carroll, Brigid and Simpson, Barbara (2012) Capturing sociality in the movement between frames : an illustration from leadership development. Human Relations, 65 (10). pp. 1283-1309. ISSN 0018-7267

[img] Text (Carroll-to-edit #bs #bs)
Carroll_to_edit_bs_bs.doc - Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (300kB)

Abstract

In this paper we offer a dynamic relational perspective in which frames and framing work together in the practice of leadership development. Mead’s (1932) notion of sociality is introduced as a way of engaging with movements within and between frames, where it is these framing movements that we argue hold the potentiality of emergent practice. The paper responds to a growing interest in the delineation, conceptualization and practice of leadership as opposed to leader development, where we understand leadership development in terms of the creation of social capital, relational capacity and collaboration. However, there is little, if any research into how these dimensions may be intentionally developed in practice. Using online forum data from an 18-month long leadership development programme, we demonstrate three different sociality movements, which we have labeled kindling, stretching and spanning. Our analysis positions sociality at the core of leadership development interventions, and practice more generally.