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Inactivation of jNK ACtivity by mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-2 in Eahy926 endothelial cells is dependent upon agonist-specific jNK translocation to the nucleus

Robinson, C. and Sloss, C.M. and Plevin, R.J. (2001) Inactivation of jNK ACtivity by mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-2 in Eahy926 endothelial cells is dependent upon agonist-specific jNK translocation to the nucleus. Cellular Signalling, 13 (1). pp. 29-41. ISSN 0898-6568

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Abstract

We have investigated the termination of agonist-stimulated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity in EAhy926 cells by MAP kinase phosphatase-2 (MKP-2). In cells expressing either wild-type (WT) or catalytically inactive (CI)-MKP-2, there was no significant differences in TNFα-stimulated JNK or p38 MAP kinase activity, however hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-stimulated JNK activity was substantially reduced in WT-MKP-2 expressing clones and enhanced in cells expressing CI-MKP-2. Consistent with these findings, we observed substantial nuclear translocation of JNK occurred in response to H2O2 but not TNFα. Using a phosphospecific anti-JNK antibody, we found that TNFα-stimulated JNK activity was associated principally with the cytosol while in response to H2O2, JNK activity was found within the nucleus. These results show that the role of MKP-2 in terminating JNK activity is determined by the translocation of JNK to the nucleus, which is under agonist-specific regulation and not a universal cellular response to stimulation.