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VIV suppression of a two-degree-of-freedom circular cylinder and drag reduction of a fixed circular cylinder by the use of helical grooves

Huang, Shan (2011) VIV suppression of a two-degree-of-freedom circular cylinder and drag reduction of a fixed circular cylinder by the use of helical grooves. Journal of Fluids and Structures, 27 (7). pp. 1124-1133. ISSN 0889-9746

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Abstract

Experimental investigations have been carried out to examine the effects of triplestarting helical grooves on the drag of fixed circular cylinders and the vortex-induced vibration of elastically supported cylinders. For the elastically supported cylinder, the Reynolds number varied from 1.3 x 104 to 4.6 x 104, whilst for the fixed cylinder from 3.1 x 104 to 3.75 x 105. A comparative approach which allows direct comparisons of the results was adopted where two cylinders of identical dimensions and physical properties with or without helical surface grooves were tested in exactly same experimental set-ups. In the elastically supported cylinder tests, the cylinders were attached to a vertically cantilevered supporting rod and towed in a towing tank. Both the in-line and cross-flow vibrations were permitted. In the fixed cylinder tests, the cylinders were supported on rigid vertical struts and towed horizontally in the same towing tank. It is found that for the case investigated the helical grooves were effective in suppressing the vortex-induced cross-flow vibration amplitudes with the peak amplitude reduced by 64%. Drag reductions of up to 25% were also achieved in the sub-critical Reynolds number range tested in the study for the fixed cylinders.