Picture of wind turbine against blue sky

Open Access research with a real impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

The Energy Systems Research Unit (ESRU) within Strathclyde's Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering is producing Open Access research that can help society deploy and optimise renewable energy systems, such as wind turbine technology.

Explore wind turbine research in Strathprints

Explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research content

Bradykinin stimulates cAMP synthesis via mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent regulation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 and prostaglandin E2 release in airway smooth muscle

Pyne, N J and Tolan, D and Pyne, S (1997) Bradykinin stimulates cAMP synthesis via mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent regulation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 and prostaglandin E2 release in airway smooth muscle. Biochemical journal, 328 (2). pp. 689-694. ISSN 0264-6021

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

Bradykinin stimulates cAMP synthesis in cultured airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. This occurs via a pathway that involves: (1) the protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK); (2) the MAPK-dependent phosphorylation and activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and (3) the utilization of cPLA2-derived arachidonate by the cyclo-oxygenase pathway to produce prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). PGE2 is released and binds to cell surface receptors to stimulate intracellular cAMP synthesis. The signalling pathway was confirmed by the use of PD098059 [the inhibitor of MAPK kinase-1 (MEK-1) activation], AACOCF3 (an inhibitor of cPLA2) and indomethacin (an inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase), which all reduced bradykinin-stimulated cAMP synthesis. Bradykinin also elicits the inhibition of approx. 60% of the total cAMP phosphodiesterase activity in the cell [Stevens, Pyne, Grady and Pyne (1994) Biochem. J. 297, 233-239]. This is likely to decrease the rate of cAMP degradation markedly and therefore to potentiate PGE2-stimulated cAMP synthesis. Acute treatment of ASM cells with PMA (a direct activator of PKC) also stimulated the MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of cPLA2. However, in contrast with bradykinin, PMA did not stimulate arachidonate release, suggesting that additional signals (e.g. Ca2+ ions) are required for phosphorylation by MAPK to activate cPLA2. PMA was also without effect on PGE2 release and cAMP synthesis. Evidence that PKC can also directly regulate adenylate cyclase was obtained by using cells pretreated with cholera toxin. Under these conditions, PMA stimulated cAMP synthesis independently of arachidonate metabolites. Furthermore the combined treatment of cells with PMA (to activate PKC) and PGE2 (to activate Gs) stimulated synergistic cAMP synthesis. This might be due to the presence of the type 2 adenylate cyclase, which is synergistically activated by Gs and PKC.