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Comparisons of the execution times and memory requirements for high-speed discrete fourier transforms and fast fourier transforms, for the measurement of AC power harmonics

Roscoe, A. J. and Burt, G. M. (2011) Comparisons of the execution times and memory requirements for high-speed discrete fourier transforms and fast fourier transforms, for the measurement of AC power harmonics. In: 2nd IMEKO TC 11 International Symposium Metrological Infrastructure, 2011-06-15 - 2011-06-17.

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Abstract

Conventional wisdom dictates that a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) will be a more computationally effective method for measuring multiple harmonics than a Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) approach. However, in this paper it is shown that carefully coded discrete transforms which distribute their computational load over many frames can be made to produce results in shorter execution times than the FFT approach, even for large number of harmonic measurement frequencies. This is because the execution time of the presented DFT actually rises with N and not the classical N2 value, while the execution time of the FFT rises with Nlog2N.