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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Cultural pluralism as a consumption behaviour

Demangeot, Catherine and Sankaran, Kizhekepat (2010) Cultural pluralism as a consumption behaviour. In: Australia-New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, University of Canterbury, 2010-11-29 - 2010-11-30.

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Abstract

This study investigates the phenomenon of cultural pluralism, defined as a pattern of consumption acts consisting in the adoption of products or consumption practices from several cultures. Initial findings from a qualitative study suggest that while the initial trial of products or practices from different cultures can result from exposure to cultural influences, personal tendencies or life trajectories, their longer-term appropriation is facilitated by resonance between contextual factors and personal dispositions. A spectrum of cultural pluralism is developed, and three markers identified: cultural purists maintain their own culture(s)’ boundaries, rarely venturing beyond; cultural incrementalists appropriate products from different cultures slowly yet enduringly, when they can blend easily with their own culture; cultural experimentalists try many products or practices for their novelty.