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A simple method for enhanced vibration-based structural health monitoring

Guechaichia, Abdelhamid and Trendafilova, Irina (2011) A simple method for enhanced vibration-based structural health monitoring. Journal of Physics Conference Series, 305 (1). ISSN 1742-6588

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Abstract

This study suggests a novel method for structural vibration-based health monitoring for beams which only utilises the first natural frequency of the beam in order to detect and localise a defect. The method is based on the application of a static force in different positions along the beam. It is shown that the application of a static force on a damaged beam induces stresses at the defect which in turn cause changes in the structural natural frequencies. A very simple procedure for damage detection is suggested which uses a static force applied in just one point, in the middle of the beam. Localisation is made using two additional application points of the static force. Damage is modelled as a small notch through the whole width of the beam. The method is demonstrated and validated numerically, using a finite element model of the beam, and experimentally for a simply supported beam. Our results show that the frequency variation with the change of the force application point can be used to detect and in the same time localize very precisely even a very small defect. The method can be extended for health monitoring of other more complicated structures.