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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

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Where will the people go?

Pacione, Michael (2003) Where will the people go? Progress in Planning, 62 (2). pp. 69-129. ISSN 0305-9006

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Abstract

The question of how and where to accommodate the growing number of households in Britain is a key issue for both academic and policy debate. The research presented in this paper identifies the principal factors underlying the increasing pressure for residential development in the countryside around major towns and cities. The relative merits of alternative forms of urban development are assessed. The potential significance of a new settlement strategy in meeting the challenge of urban development in the United Kingdom in the 21st century is highlighted. With the United Kingdom policy environment as conceptual framework, the discussion examines three key issues that affect the nature and feasibility of new settlements. These relate to the distribution of the costs and benefits of development; the social balance of new communities; and the appropriate development agency. The conceptual analysis of the new settlement strategy is complemented by empirical evidence from major stakeholders in relation to key aspects of the new settlement option. Finally, a number of policy-oriented recommendations are presented to inform development of a new programme of new settlements for Britain in the early 21st century.