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Reading children/children reading: the problematic nature of eighteenth century children's literature in Locke, Rousseau and Day

Furniss, Tom (2005) Reading children/children reading: the problematic nature of eighteenth century children's literature in Locke, Rousseau and Day. Corvey Women Writers on the Web (CW3), 3. ISSN 1744-9618

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Abstract

This essay locates Thomas Day's The History of Sandford and Merton: A Work Intended for the Use of Children (1787-1789) within eighteenth-century debates about childhood and children's literature. It begins by arguing that John Locke, in Some Thoughts Concerning Education (1693), both established the principles for a revolution in children's literature and brought into question the very possibility of such a literature.