A multicentre point prevalence study of antibiotics utilization in hospitalized patients in an urban secondary and a tertiary healthcare facilities in Nigeria : findings and implications

Ogunleye, Olayinka O. and Oyawole, Modupe R. and Odunuga, Patricia T. and Kalejaye, Folasade and Yinka-Ogunleye, Adesola F. and Olalekan, Adesola and Ogundele, Sunday O. and Ebruke, Bernard E. and Richard, Atinuke Kalada and Paramadhas, Bene D Anand and Kurdi, Amanj and Sneddon, Jacqueline and Seaton, Andrew and Godman, Brian (2021) A multicentre point prevalence study of antibiotics utilization in hospitalized patients in an urban secondary and a tertiary healthcare facilities in Nigeria : findings and implications. Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy. ISSN 1744-8336

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    Abstract

    Objectives: The understanding of antimicrobial utilization patterns is pertinent to successful implementation of the National Action Plans on Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR). There is, however, limited information on antibiotics utilization in Nigeria. This study was undertaken to build on existing information and provide direction for appropriate interventions including Antibiotics Stewardship Programs (ASP). Method: A Point Prevalence Study (PPS) was conducted in two public urban health facilities in Lagos, Nigeria using a design adapted from the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and Global-PPS surveys. Results: The prevalence of antibiotics use was 80.6% administered mostly parenterally (83.1% of total prescriptions) with concerns with extended surgical antibiotics prophylaxis. The mostly used antibiotics in the secondary hospital were parenteral metronidazole (32.4%), ceftriaxone (27.5%), and amoxicillin + clavulanate (8.2%) while the mostly used in the tertiary hospital were ceftriaxone (25.3%), parenteral metronidazole (19.1%), and amoxicillin + clavulanate (9.3%). There was an appreciable lack of specific functional capacities, policies, and processes to promote appropriate antimicrobial use in both hospitals. Conclusions: There is high rate of antibiotics utilization in these facilities with lack of institutional frameworks and processes for ensuring appropriate antibiotic use. The study provides the information needed to improve future antimicrobial use in hospitals and reduce AMR.

    ORCID iDs

    Ogunleye, Olayinka O., Oyawole, Modupe R., Odunuga, Patricia T., Kalejaye, Folasade, Yinka-Ogunleye, Adesola F., Olalekan, Adesola, Ogundele, Sunday O., Ebruke, Bernard E., Richard, Atinuke Kalada, Paramadhas, Bene D Anand, Kurdi, Amanj ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5036-1988, Sneddon, Jacqueline, Seaton, Andrew and Godman, Brian;