Picture of UK Houses of Parliament

Leading national thinking on politics, government & public policy through Open Access research

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Government & Public Policy, based within the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.

Research here is 1st in Scotland for research intensity and spans a wide range of domains. The Department of Politics demonstrates expertise in understanding parties, elections and public opinion, with additional emphases on political economy, institutions and international relations. This international angle is reflected in the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC) which conducts comparative research on public policy. Meanwhile, the Centre for Energy Policy provides independent expertise on energy, working across multidisciplinary groups to shape policy for a low carbon economy.

Explore the Open Access research of the School of Government & Public Policy. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

An Analysis of the Electoral Use of Policy on Law and Order by New Labour

Drinkwater, Stephen and Jennings, Colin (2012) An Analysis of the Electoral Use of Policy on Law and Order by New Labour. Discussion paper. University of Strathclyde, Glasgow.

[img]
Preview
Text (Drinkwater-Jennings-2012-An-analysis-of-the-electoral-use-of-policy-on-law-and-order-by-new-labour)
Drinkwater_Jennings_2012_An_analysis_of_the_electoral_use_of_policy_on_law_and_order_by_new_labour.pdf
Final Published Version

Download (201kB)| Preview

    Abstract

    There has been much debate regarding the electoral strategy adopted by New Labour in the lead-up to and then during their time in government. This paper addresses the issue from the perspective of left/right and libertarian/authoritarian considerations by examining data on individual attitudes from the British Social Attitudes survey between 1986 and 2009. The analysis indicates that New Labour’s move towards the right on economic and public policy was the main driver towards attracting new centrist voters and could thus be labelled ‘broadly’ populist. The move towards a tougher stance on law and order was more ‘narrowly’ populist in that it was used more to minimise the reduction in support from Labour’s traditional base on the left than to attract new votes.