Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

Expression of glutathione-S-transferases in hepatocytes cultured on collagen gels of different composition

Kataropoulou, M. and Henderson, C.J. and Grant, M.H. (2002) Expression of glutathione-S-transferases in hepatocytes cultured on collagen gels of different composition. Toxicology, 192. pp. 87-88. ISSN 0300-483X

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

The use of primary hepatocyte cultures as in vitro models for studying xenobiotic metabolism and toxicity is limited by the loss of liver-specific differentiated functions with time in culture. This study investigates the effect of incorporating 20% chondroitin-6-sulphate (Ch6SO4), a glycosaminoglycan (GAG), into collagen gels (0.3% w/v), and crosslinking the gels with either 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) or 1,6-diaminohexane (DAH) on the expression and total activity of glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) in hepatocytes cultured for 7 days. GSTs are a family of isoenzymes. The main isoenzyme in the male rat liver is the alpha form (which exists as several subunits (Ya and Yc2 were measured here)). The pi form (subunit Yf) is not normally present in liver, but is expressed in conditions where the liver cells are de-differentiated.