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Pre-, syn- and post-CO2 injection geochemical and isotopic monitoring at the pembina cardium CO2 monitoring pilot, Alberta, Canada

Johnson, Gareth and Dalkhaa, Chantsalmaa and Shevalier, Maurice and Nightingale, Michael and Mayer, Bernhard and Haszeldine, Stuart (2014) Pre-, syn- and post-CO2 injection geochemical and isotopic monitoring at the pembina cardium CO2 monitoring pilot, Alberta, Canada. Energy Procedia, 63. pp. 4150-4154. ISSN 1876-6102

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Abstract

Geochemical and isotopic data acquired pre-, syn- And post- CO2 injection at the Pembina Cardium CO2 Monitoring Pilot in Alberta, Canada is presented. To the author's knowledge this is the first project that has collected and interpreted comprehensive geochemical data over the full life cycle of a CO2 injection project. Of the 40 parameters measured per sample changes in pH, alkalinity, Ca2+, Fe2+, δ13C of CO2 and δ18O of H2O proved to be the most useful parameters as tracers of CO2 presence and for identifying solubility and mineral trapping in the reservoirs thus demonstrating CO2 retention mechanisms.