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Security of storage in carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery

Stewart, R. Jamie and Johnson, Gareth and Haszeldine, Stuart and Olden, Peter and Mackay, Eric and Mayer, Bernhard and Shevalier, Maurice and Nightingale, Michael (2017) Security of storage in carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery. Energy Procedia, 114. pp. 3870-3878. ISSN 1876-6102

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    Abstract

    The Pembina Cardium CO2 Monitoring Pilot was used as a test site to determine the relative roles of trapping mechanisms. Two methods to assess this distribution are presented. A geochemical approach using empirical data from the site was used to determine the phase distribution of CO2 at a number of production wells that were sampled monthly during a two-year CO2 injection pilot. In addition, a simplified reservoir simulation was performed. Results indicate that significant amounts of CO2 are stored in the oil phase thus reducing the amount of CO2 available as a buoyant free phase and hence increasing storage security.