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A review of the emerging role of silk for the treatment of the eye

Tran, Simon H. and Wilson, Clive G. and Seib, F. Philipp (2018) A review of the emerging role of silk for the treatment of the eye. Pharmaceutical Research, 35 (12). ISSN 0724-8741

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    Abstract

    Silk is a remarkable biopolymer with a long history of medical use. Silk fabrications have a robust track record for load-bearing applications, including surgical threads and meshes, which are clinically approved for use in humans. The progression of top-down and bottom-up engineering approaches using silk as the basis of a drug delivery or cell-loaded matrix helped to re-ignite interest in this ancient material. This review comprehensively summarises the current applications of silk for tissue engineering and drug delivery, with specific reference to the eye. Additionally, the review also covers emerging trends for the use of silk as a biologically active biopolymer for the treatment of eye disorders. The review concludes with future capabilities of silk to contribute to advanced, electronically-enhanced ocular drug delivery concepts.