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Computable Records : The Next Generation of the EMR Conversation

Rimpilainen, Sanna (2015) Computable Records : The Next Generation of the EMR Conversation. [Report]

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Abstract

In 2016 and onward, computable medical records will fuel the next generation of EHRs, as the quest for interoperable, portable, and comprehensive health data continues. Computable medical records, readable by both human and machine, will house a patient’s entire record from conception to death. Importantly, such records will declare their fidelity level — their degree of completeness and accuracy — so that users can not only identify what data is there, but also what’s missing. The computable medical record will be unique, enabling users to find the right record for the right person; will support a health status scoring system; and will ideally be open source to drive adoption across software vendors, hospital systems, and government.