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An Analysis of the Opportunities and Challenges Involved in the Formal Delivery of Self-Management Support in Diabetes using Digital Health Initiatives

Rooney, Laura and Rimpilainen, Sanna (2016) An Analysis of the Opportunities and Challenges Involved in the Formal Delivery of Self-Management Support in Diabetes using Digital Health Initiatives. Masters thesis, UNSPECIFIED.

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Abstract

This thesis will critically analyse self-management (SM) support services available in Scotland in the form of a gap analysis and demonstrate how digital solutions are required to increase the efficiency of health services nationally in order to fill these gaps. Firstly, the overall concept of self-management will be defined, including its importance in the treatment of long term conditions (LTC), using diabetes as an exemplary condition. This will be followed by an overview of the challenges involved in the delivery of self-management support in a ‘pre-digital’ era, where digital solutions have not been widely implemented. A review of the gaps present in the current provision of self-management support services will be demonstrated and an examination of appropriate digital solutions which could fill these gaps will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on projects run by the Digital Health and Care Institute and the challenges faced in implementing them.