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Plasma-based wakefield accelerators as sources of axion-like particles

Burton, David A and Noble, Adam (2018) Plasma-based wakefield accelerators as sources of axion-like particles. New Journal of Physics, 20. ISSN 1367-2630

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Abstract

We estimate the average flux density of minimally-coupled axion-like particles generated by a laser-driven plasma wakefield propagating along a constant strong magnetic field. Our calculations suggest that a terrestrial source based on this approach could generate a pulse of axion-like particles whose flux density is comparable to that of solar axion-like particles at Earth. This mechanism is optimal for axion-like particles with mass in the range of interest of contemporary experiments designed to detect dark matter using microwave cavities.