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Examining the determinants and outcomes of mobile app engagement- a longitudinal perspective

McLean, Graeme (2018) Examining the determinants and outcomes of mobile app engagement- a longitudinal perspective. Computers in Human Behaviour. ISSN 0747-5632

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Abstract

Through undertaking a longitudinal study with 474 consumers over a 12-month period and conducting structural equation modelling, this research provides insight on the determinants and outcomes of consumer engagement with a retailer’s m-commerce application. Critical outcomes of positive attitudes towards the brand and loyalty towards the brand derive from consumer engagement with a retailer’s m-commerce app. Drawing upon the TAM, TTF and SDT, the research established perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, convenience and enjoyment influencing engagement with an m-commerce application, while customisation of the app has an enhancing influence on engagement. The findings assert that utilitarian variables of perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness and convenience become even more influential on engagement with a retailer’s m-commerce application following continued retention, while enjoyment becomes less important. However, the research finds that the location of use has an effect on the variables influencing engagement with an m-commerce application.