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SERS in biology/biomedical SERS : general discussion

Baumberg, Jeremy and Bell, Steven and Bonifacio, Alois and Chikkaraddy, Rohit and Chisanga, Malama and Corsetti, Stella and Delfino, Ines and Eremina, Olga and Fasolato, Claudia and Faulds, Karen and Fleming, Holly and Goodacre, Roy and Graham, Duncan and Hardy, Mike and Jamieson, Lauren and Keyes, Tia and Królikowska, Agata and Kuttner, Christian and Langer, Judith and Lightner, Carin and Mahajan, Sumeet and Masson, Jean Francois and Muhamadali, Howbeer and Natan, Michael and Nicolson, Fay and Nikelshparg, Evelina and Plakas, Konstantinos and Popp, Jürgen and Porter, Marc and Prezgot, Daniel and Pytlik, Nathalie and Schlücker, Sebastian and Silvestri, Alessandro and Stone, Nick and Tian, Zhong Qun and Tripathi, Ashish and Willner, Marjorie and Wuytens, Pieter (2017) SERS in biology/biomedical SERS : general discussion. Faraday Discussions, 205. pp. 429-456. ISSN 1359-6640

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Abstract

Jürgen Popp opened a general discussion of the paper by Roy Goodacre: What is the advantage of using SERS instead of ordinary Raman spectroscopy?