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Promoting undergraduate student engagement through self-generated exam activity

Muñoz-Escalona, Patricia and Savage, Kathleen and Conway, Fiona and McLaren, Andrew (2018) Promoting undergraduate student engagement through self-generated exam activity. International Journal of Mechanical Engineering Education. ISSN 0306-4190

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Abstract

Self-generated exam activity was implemented in 2nd year undergraduate students of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering degree to promote engagement. The activity was demonstrated to be effective regarding enhancement of learning outcomes through the promotion of deep learning, and partnership through cooperative and collaborative work. Results indicated that ~80% of the students engaged with the activity and were satisfied with the learning outcomes. In general students (>80%) perceived themselves as co-creators and co-owners of the self-generated exam. Results also showed that academic staff encouragement and motivation affects students’ co-creation and that students are satisfied when involved in their learning process