Picture of DNA strand

Pioneering chemical biology & medicinal chemistry through Open Access research...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Pure & Applied Chemistry, based within the Faculty of Science.

Research here spans a wide range of topics from analytical chemistry to materials science, and from biological chemistry to theoretical chemistry. The specific work in chemical biology and medicinal chemistry, as an example, encompasses pioneering techniques in synthesis, bioinformatics, nucleic acid chemistry, amino acid chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, biophysical chemistry and NMR spectroscopy.

Explore the Open Access research of the Department of Pure & Applied Chemistry. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

An integrative approach to decipher the chemical antagonism between the competing endophytes paraconiothyrium variabile and Bacillus subtilis

Vallet, Marine and Vanbellingen, Quentin P. and Fu, Tingting and Le Caer, Jean-Pierre and Della-Negra, Serge and Touboul, David and Duncan, Katherine R. and Nay, Bastien and Brunelle, Alain and Prado, Soizic (2017) An integrative approach to decipher the chemical antagonism between the competing endophytes paraconiothyrium variabile and Bacillus subtilis. Journal of Natural Products, 80 (11). 2863–2873. ISSN 0163-3864

[img]
Preview
Text (Vallet-etal-JNP-2017-An-integrative-approach-to-decipher-the-chemical-antagonism-between-the-competing-endophytes)
Vallet_etal_JNP_2017_An_integrative_approach_to_decipher_the_chemical_antagonism_between_the_competing_endophytes.pdf
Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (2MB)| Preview

    Abstract

    An integrative approach combining traditional natural products chemistry, molecular networking, and mass spectrometry imaging has been undertaken to decipher the molecular dialogue between the fungus Paraconiothyrium variabile and the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, which were isolated as endophytes from the conifer Cephalotaxus harringtonia and are characterized by a strong and mutual antibiosis. From this study, we highlight that bacterial surfactins and a fungal tetronic acid are involved in such competition and that the fungus is able to hydrolyze surfactins to fight against the bacterial partner.