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Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for in vivo biosensing

Laing, Stacey and Jamieson, Lauren E. and Faulds, Karen and Graham, Duncan (2017) Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for in vivo biosensing. Nature Reviews Chemistry, 1. ISSN 2397-3358

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    Abstract

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is of interest for biomedical analysis and imaging because of its sensitivity, specificity and multiplexing capabilities. The successful application of SERS for in vivo biosensing requires probes to be biocompatible and procedures to be minimally invasive, challenges that have respectively been met by developing new nanoprobes and instrumentation. This Review presents recent developments in these areas, describing case studies in which sensors have been implemented, as well as outlining shortcomings that must be addressed before SERS sees clinical use.