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Varieties of CSR : institutions and socially responsible behaviour

Demirbag, Mehmet and Wood, Geoffrey and Makhmadshoev, Dilshod and Rymkevich, Olga (2017) Varieties of CSR : institutions and socially responsible behaviour. International Business Review. ISSN 0969-5931 (In Press)

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Abstract

A central concern within contemporary socio-economics has been on the relationship between national institutional configurations and societal outcomes. In this paper, we assess the relationship between legal origin and a range of correlated indicators of social responsibility, focusing on socially responsible investing and voluntary charitable giving. We found that in Common Law contexts, lower levels of social responsibility than in Civil Law contexts, other than in the area of charitable giving, where the converse was the case. We explore the reasons for this distinction, and for the different patterns encountered in post-socialist Central and Eastern Europe. Based on the findings, we identify directions for future research.