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Constructing tissue-like complex structures using cell-laden DNA hydrogel bricks

Wang, Yijie and Shao, Yu and Ma, Xiaozhou and Zhou, Bini and Faulkner-Jones, Alan and Shu, Wenmiao and Liu, Dongsheng (2017) Constructing tissue-like complex structures using cell-laden DNA hydrogel bricks. ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 9 (14). pp. 12311-12315. ISSN 1944-8244

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Abstract

Tissue engineering has long been a challenge because of the difficulty of addressing the requirements that such an engineered tissue must meet. In this paper, we developed a new "brick-to-wall" based on unique properties of DNA supramolecular hydrogels to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) tissuelike structures: different cell types are encapsulated in DNA hydrogel bricks which are then combined to build 3D structures. Signal responsiveness of cells through the DNA gels was evaluated and it was discovered that the gel permits cell migration in 3D. The results demonstrated that this technology is convenient, effective and reliable for cell manipulation, and we believe that it will benefit artificial tissue fabrication and future large-scale production.