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Yaw control for 20MW offshore multi rotor system

MacMahon, Euan Niall and Stock, Adam and Leithead, William and Jamieson, Peter (2015) Yaw control for 20MW offshore multi rotor system. In: European Wind Energy Association Annual Event (EWEA 2015), 2015-11-17 - 2015-11-20, Paris expo Porte de Versailles.

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Abstract

A Simulink model of a 20MW multi rotor system (MRS) is built containing all the necessary detail to demonstrate yaw control for a novel yawing technique. The aerodynamics of each rotor are based on blade element momentum theory summed across a single actuator with the rotor and power conversion system modelled as a lumped mass model. A yaw controller is designed which operates by manipulating the thrusts of the rotors. The feasibility of this yaw mechanism is demonstrated by implementing it at wind speeds of 8m/s, 11m/s and 15m/s. At each wind speed the system remained stable with the yaw error kept within a maximum of 5 degrees over a two hour period.