Picture offshore wind farm

Open Access research that is improving renewable energy technology...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers across the departments of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering (MAE), Electronic & Electrical Engineering (EEE), and Naval Architecture, Ocean & Marine Engineering (NAOME), all of which are leading research into aspects of wind energy, the control of wind turbines and wind farms.

Researchers at EEE are examining the dynamic analysis of turbines, their modelling and simulation, control system design and their optimisation, along with resource assessment and condition monitoring issues. The Energy Systems Research Unit (ESRU) within MAE is producing research to achieve significant levels of energy efficiency using new and renewable energy systems. Meanwhile, researchers at NAOME are supporting the development of offshore wind, wave and tidal-current energy to assist in the provision of diverse energy sources and economic growth in the renewable energy sector.

Explore Open Access research by EEE, MAE and NAOME on renewable energy technologies. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Investigation into suitable carrier molecules for use in an anti-gonadotrophin releasing hormone vaccine

Ferro, V. A. and Stimson, W. H. (1998) Investigation into suitable carrier molecules for use in an anti-gonadotrophin releasing hormone vaccine. Vaccine, 16 (11-12). pp. 1095-1102. ISSN 0264-410X

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Gonadal function can be controlled through immunoneutralisation of gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH), with an analogue, GnRH-glycys, linked to a carrier molecule and an appropriate adjuvant. In this study, four different types of carrier molecule were investigated: (a) single and branched amino acid polymers--[poly-(D-glu, D-lys) and poly-(phe, glu)-poly(DL-ala)-poly(lys)]; (b) bacterial toxoids--diphtheria (DT) and tetanus (TT); (c) synthetic T-helper epitopes--derived from malarial circumsporozite protein (CS) and measles virus fusion protein (MVF); and (d) thyroglobulin (Thy)--a large protein. The effect of non-ionic surfactant vesicles (NISV) and an aluminum hydroxide based adjuvant (alum), was also examined. Although good antibody responses were achieved with GnRH-glycys-DT, GnRH-glycys-TT and GnRH-glycys-Thy, adsorbed onto alum and the dimerised synthetic T-helper epitope constructs, incorporated into NISV, a critical antibody titre was necessary to result in morphological changes in the gonads and complete suppression of spermatogenesis. This was only achieved with tetanus toxoid and the dimerised T-helper epitopes.