Picture of UK Houses of Parliament

Leading national thinking on politics, government & public policy through Open Access research

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the School of Government & Public Policy, based within the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.

Research here is 1st in Scotland for research intensity and spans a wide range of domains. The Department of Politics demonstrates expertise in understanding parties, elections and public opinion, with additional emphases on political economy, institutions and international relations. This international angle is reflected in the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC) which conducts comparative research on public policy. Meanwhile, the Centre for Energy Policy provides independent expertise on energy, working across multidisciplinary groups to shape policy for a low carbon economy.

Explore the Open Access research of the School of Government & Public Policy. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Iron supported on bioinspired green silica for water remediation

Alotaibi, Khalid M. and Shiels, Lewis and Lacaze, Laure and Peshkur, Tanya A. and Anderson, Peter and Machala, Libor and Critchley, Kevin and Patwardhan, Siddharth V. and Gibson, Lorraine T. (2016) Iron supported on bioinspired green silica for water remediation. Chemical Science, 8. pp. 567-576. ISSN 2041-6520

[img]
Preview
Text (Alotaibi-etal-CS-2016-Iron-supported-on-bioinspired-green-silica-for-water-remediation)
Alotaibi_etal_CS_2016_Iron_supported_on_bioinspired_green_silica_for_water_remediation.pdf
Final Published Version
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 logo

Download (862kB)| Preview

    Abstract

    Iron has been used previously in water decontamination, either unsupported or supported on clays, polymers, carbons or ceramics such as silica. However, the reported synthesis procedures are tedious, lengthy (involving various steps), and either utilise or produce toxic chemicals. Herein, the use of a simple, rapid, bio-inspired green synthesis method is reported to prepare, for the first time, a family of iron supported on green nanosilica materials (Fe@GN) to create new technological solutions for water remediation. In particular, Fe@GN were employed for the removal of arsenate ions as a model for potentially toxic elements in aqueous solution. Several characterization techniques were used to study the physical, structural and chemical properties of the new Fe@GN. When evaluated as an adsorption platform for the removal of arsenate ions, Fe@GN exhibited high adsorption capacity (69 mg of As per g of Fe@GN) with superior kinetics (reaching 35 mg As per g sorbent per hr) – threefold higher than the highest removal rates reported to date. Moreover, a method was developed to regenerate the Fe@GN allowing for a full recovery and reuse of the adsorbent in subsequent extractions; strongly highlighting the potential technological benefits of these new green materials.