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The reciprocal nature of organizational sponsorship : how family and non-family parent firms sponsor their spinoffs

Georgaklis, Steven Arthur and Levie, Jonathan (2015) The reciprocal nature of organizational sponsorship : how family and non-family parent firms sponsor their spinoffs. In: International council for Small business, 2015-06-06 - 2015-06-09.

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Abstract

Fewer than 50% of new ventures last more than 5 years, yet entrepreneurial activity remains the life blood of economic activity among nations (Aldrich & Ruef, 2006). Governments, organizations and firms have established initiatives and incentives which foster and protect new ventures as a form of sponsorship. Yet since Flynn’s (1993a,b,c) pioneering work on organizational sponsorship, relatively little work has been conducted on how parent firms, whether family owned or not, sponsor new ventures, with the exception of research on incubators (e.g. Amezcua et al, 2013).