Inter-professional prescribing masterclass for medical students and non-medical prescribing students (nurses and pharmacists): a pilot study

Paterson, R and Rolfe, A and Coll, A and Kinnear, M (2015) Inter-professional prescribing masterclass for medical students and non-medical prescribing students (nurses and pharmacists): a pilot study. Scottish Medical Journal, 60 (4). pp. 202-207. ISSN 0036-9330

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    Abstract

    Background and aims: Prescribing errors cause significant patient morbidity and mortality. Current legislation allows prescribing by different health professions. Inter-professional collaboration and learning may result in safer prescribing practice. This study aimed to develop, pilot and test the feasibility of a simulated inter-professional prescribing masterclass for non-medical prescribing students, medical students and pharmacists. Methods and results: A three-scenario, simulated patient session was designed and implemented by an expert panel. Medical students, non-medical prescribing students and pharmacists worked together to formulate and implement evidence-based prescriptions. The Readiness for Inter-professional Learning Score (RIPLS) and a self-efficacy score were administered to the students and the Trust in Physician Score to the simulated patients. Overall, the RIPLS and self-efficacy scores increased. Pharmacists showed the highest rating in the Trust in Physician score. Post masterclass group discussions suggested that the intervention was viewed as a positive educational experience. Conclusion: An inter-professional prescribing masterclass is feasible and acceptable to students. It increases self-efficacy, readiness for inter-professional learning and allows students to learn from, about and with each other. A larger study is warranted and the use of feedback from simulated patients explored further.