Picture of blood cells

Open Access research which pushes advances in bionanotechnology

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy & Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS) , based within the Faculty of Science.

SIPBS is a major research centre in Scotland focusing on 'new medicines', 'better medicines' and 'better use of medicines'. This includes the exploration of nanoparticles and nanomedicines within the wider research agenda of bionanotechnology, in which the tools of nanotechnology are applied to solve biological problems. At SIPBS multidisciplinary approaches are also pursued to improve bioscience understanding of novel therapeutic targets with the aim of developing therapeutic interventions and the investigation, development and manufacture of drug substances and products.

Explore the Open Access research of SIPBS. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Hyperspectral imaging for erosion detection in wind turbine blades

Young, Andrew and Kay, Andy and Marshall, Stephen and Torr, Ralph and Gray, Alison (2016) Hyperspectral imaging for erosion detection in wind turbine blades. In: Proceedings of HSI 2016, 12-13th October 2016. UNSPECIFIED, England.

[img]
Preview
Text (Young-etal-HSI2016-Hyperspetcral-imaging-for-erosion-detection-in-wind-turbine-blades)
Young_etal_HSI2016_Hyperspetcral_imaging_for_erosion_detection_in_wind_turbine_blades.pdf
Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (7MB)| Preview

    Abstract

    Inspection of wind turbine blades is required to identify any defects or failures and decide on any remedial actions e.g. blade repair or replacement. Traditionally, inspections have been performed by rope access technicians who visually inspect the blades and record damage using standard photographic equipment. Recent developments have seen an increase in popularity in the use of remote based inspection techniques using ground mounted cameras and cameras installed on Remotely Operated Aerial Vehicles, more commonly referred to as drones. Whilst these techniques remove the need for human access to the blades, imaging is performed remotely and does not always provide adequate image quality using standard high definition cameras. As a result, there is a growing interest in imaging techniques based on other regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Laboratory and field based trials are required to properly examine this potential and understand which frequencies can be applied to imaging blades. This paper demonstrates a Hyperspectral Imaging technique in its application to imaging surface defects on a section of wind turbine blade in a laboratory.