Picture of DNA strand

Pioneering chemical biology & medicinal chemistry through Open Access research...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Pure & Applied Chemistry, based within the Faculty of Science.

Research here spans a wide range of topics from analytical chemistry to materials science, and from biological chemistry to theoretical chemistry. The specific work in chemical biology and medicinal chemistry, as an example, encompasses pioneering techniques in synthesis, bioinformatics, nucleic acid chemistry, amino acid chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, biophysical chemistry and NMR spectroscopy.

Explore the Open Access research of the Department of Pure & Applied Chemistry. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

The productivity of knowledge mobilisation, knowledge capitalisation and product-related firm transmutation : exploring the case of small-scale garment-makers in Nairobi, Kenya

Mwaura, Samuel (2016) The productivity of knowledge mobilisation, knowledge capitalisation and product-related firm transmutation : exploring the case of small-scale garment-makers in Nairobi, Kenya. Industry and Innovation. ISSN 1469-8390

[img]
Preview
Text (Mwaura-II-2016-The-productivity-of-knowledge-mobilisation-knowledge-capitalisation)
Mwaura_II_2016_The_productivity_of_knowledge_mobilisation_knowledge_capitalisation.pdf
Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (254kB) | Preview

Abstract

Highlighting the limitations of R&D, this paper champions design activity as the phenomenon that captures knowledge mobilisation at the firm level, especially amongst small firms in developing countries. Still, knowledge becomes a capital (factor input) proper when employed in production. Volumes of new products sold could suggest the market value of utilised knowledge capital the same way the resale value of plant and equipment often approximates the stock of physical capital. Conversely, shares of sales of new products arguably capture an altogether different phenomenon: product-related firm transmutation. Findings suggest that the deeper utilisation of knowledge has significant productivity effects and supersedes mere mobilisation of knowledge. Further, undergoing transmutation towards the production of more of new products relative to incumbent products has no significant relationship with labour productivity. Firms should therefore prioritise the deeper exploitation of given new knowledge rather than potentially prodigal shifts in production towards new products as such.