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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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Measuring free-living physical activity in COPD patients : Deriving methodology standards for clinical trials through a review of research studies

Byrom, Bill and Rowe, David A. (2016) Measuring free-living physical activity in COPD patients : Deriving methodology standards for clinical trials through a review of research studies. Contemporary Clinical Trials, 47. pp. 172-184. ISSN 1551-7144

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Abstract

This article presents a review of the research literature to identify the methodology used and outcome measures derived in the use of accelerometers to measure free-living activity in patients with COPD. Using this and existing empirical validity evidence we further identify standards for use, and recommended clinical outcome measures from continuous accelerometer data to describe pertinent measures of sedentary behaviour and physical activity in this and similar patient populations. We provide measures of the strength of evidence to support our recommendations and identify areas requiring continued research. Our findings support the use of accelerometry in clinical trials to understand and measure treatment-related changes in free-living physical activity and sedentary behaviour in patient populations with limited activity.