Picture of DNA strand

Pioneering chemical biology & medicinal chemistry through Open Access research...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Pure & Applied Chemistry, based within the Faculty of Science.

Research here spans a wide range of topics from analytical chemistry to materials science, and from biological chemistry to theoretical chemistry. The specific work in chemical biology and medicinal chemistry, as an example, encompasses pioneering techniques in synthesis, bioinformatics, nucleic acid chemistry, amino acid chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, biophysical chemistry and NMR spectroscopy.

Explore the Open Access research of the Department of Pure & Applied Chemistry. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Nerve growth factor stimulation of p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase in PC12 cells: role of G(i/o), G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, beta-arrestin I, and endocytic processing

Rakhit, S. and Pyne, S. and Pyne, N.J. (2001) Nerve growth factor stimulation of p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase in PC12 cells: role of G(i/o), G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, beta-arrestin I, and endocytic processing. Molecular Pharmacology, 60 (1). pp. 63-70. ISSN 0026-895X

Full text not available in this repository.Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

In this study, we have shown that nerve growth factor (NGF)-dependent activation of the p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p42/p44 MAPK) pathway in PC12 cells can be partially blocked by pertussis toxin (which inactivates the G proteins Gi/o). This suggests that the Trk A receptor may use a G protein-coupled receptor pathway to signal to p42/p44 MAPK. This was supported by data showing that the NGF-dependent activation of p42/p44 MAPK is potentiated in cells transfected with G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) or beta -arrestin I. Moreover, GRK2 is constitutively bound with the Trk A receptor, whereas NGF stimulates the pertussis toxin-sensitive binding of beta -arrestin I to the TrkA receptor-GRK2 complex. Both GRK2 and beta -arrestin I are involved in clathrin-mediated endocytic signaling to p42/p44 MAPK. Indeed, inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (e.g., monodansylcadaverine, concanavalin A, and hyperosmolar sucrose) reduced the NGF-dependent activation of p42/p44 MAPK. Finally, we have found that the G protein-coupled receptor-dependent component regulating p42/p44 MAPK is required for NGF-induced differentiation of PC12 cells. Thus, NGF-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis was partially blocked by PD098059 (inhibitor of MAPK kinase-1 activation) and pertussis toxin. Our findings are the first to show that the Trk A receptor uses a classic G protein-coupled receptor-signaling pathway to promote differentiation of PC12 cells.