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How Work Can Damage Your Health : The Case for 'Decent' Work

Trebeck, Katherine (2015) How Work Can Damage Your Health : The Case for 'Decent' Work. [Report]

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    Abstract

    The way we value, structure, manage and reward work impacts on individuals doing that work and on society more widely. This policy brief explores a growing body of evidence that, across the UK, today’s labour market is failing too many workers in multiple ways. It is not delivering sufficient positive outcomes for enough people. Yet comparative evidence suggests there is nothing inevitable about this trend. The impact of a lot of work today on individual health, both physical and mental, and on families and communities is causing considerable concern. There are significant economic costs too. This paper advocates the promotion of more ‘decent work’, explains what that might entail, and illustrates some of the policy changes required to create more quality work for more of our people.