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EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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Sharing happy information : responses and self-portrayal

Tinto, Fiona and Ruthven, Ian (2015) Sharing happy information : responses and self-portrayal. Information Research, 20 (1). ISSN 1368-1613

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Abstract

This study examines the information behaviour of individuals when sharing 'happy' information. Thirty semi-structured interviews were conducted with frequent Internet users who share happy information. Content analysis of the interviews explored the factors impacting upon the importance of responses, emotional experience of sharing happy information and how people use happy information to portray representations of themselves. We present results on when receiving responses to information sharing are important and when they are not, the factors that lead to differences in information sharing on different platforms and how sharing happy information relates to portrayals of self. This study sheds light on information sharing within casual leisure information environments. It also demonstrates the importance of certain types of response on future information sharing behaviour.