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Performance of triggered multi gap plasma closing switches filled with air, nitrogen and a nitrogen/oxygen mixture

Hogg, M. and Timoshkin, I. and MacGregor, S. and Given, M. and Wilson, M. and Wang, T. (2014) Performance of triggered multi gap plasma closing switches filled with air, nitrogen and a nitrogen/oxygen mixture. In: Proceedings of the XXth International Conference on Gas Discharges and their Applications. UNSPECIFIED, pp. 598-601.

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Abstract

This paper presents an experimental investigation into operation of a triggered, two electrode switch energised with a HV impulses superimposed over a DC charging voltage. A sphere-sphere topology with an electrode separation of 2 mm was DC energised to 6 kV, 7 kV and 8 kV and triggering impulses of varying dV/dt have been used. Breakdown voltage, time delay to breakdown and jitter have been measured for air, nitrogen and a 60% nitrogen/40% oxygen mixture. It is shown that higher dV/dt and higher DC energisation provide more stable and shorter time delays to breakdown.