Picture of boy being examining by doctor at a tuberculosis sanatorium

Understanding our future through Open Access research about our past...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Centre for the Social History of Health & Healthcare (CSHHH), based within the School of Humanities, and considered Scotland's leading centre for the history of health and medicine.

Research at CSHHH explores the modern world since 1800 in locations as diverse as the UK, Asia, Africa, North America, and Europe. Areas of specialism include contraception and sexuality; family health and medical services; occupational health and medicine; disability; the history of psychiatry; conflict and warfare; and, drugs, pharmaceuticals and intoxicants.

Explore the Open Access research of the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare. Or explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research...

Image: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. Wellcome Collection - CC-BY.

Alfvén wave heating and acceleration of plasmas in the solar transition region producing jet-like eruptive activity

Whitelam, S. and Ashbourn, J. M. A. and Bingham, R. and Shukla, P. K. and Spicer, D. S. (2002) Alfvén wave heating and acceleration of plasmas in the solar transition region producing jet-like eruptive activity. Solar Physics, 211 (1-2). pp. 199-219. ISSN 0038-0938

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

We present an analysis of observations and theory of selected transition-region phenomena, concentrating on small scale jet-like structures known as spicules and macrospicules. We examine a number of mechanisms that may be responsible for their formation and conclude that Alfvén waves could provide the necessary acceleration through the ponderomotive force and dissipation for heating forming a beam or jet like structure. In applying the Alfvén wave model we make no fundamental distinction between spicules and macrospicules. In this respect we consider them to be manifestations of the same phenomenon on different scales. We predict that the most effective Alfvén waves have frequencies around 1 Hz and amplitudes of 1 V m−1. The resulting plasma jet sets up plasma conditions suitable for creating rotating structures which are also observed.