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A model of personality change after traumatic brain injury and the development of the Brain Injury Personality Scales (BIPS)

Obonsawin, M. and Jefferis, S. and Lowe, R.A. and Crawford, J.R. and Fernandes, J. and Holland, L.M. and Woldt, K. and Worthington, E.J. and Bowie, G. (2007) A model of personality change after traumatic brain injury and the development of the Brain Injury Personality Scales (BIPS). Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 78. pp. 1239-1247. ISSN 0022-3050

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Abstract

The aims of this study were to develop models of personality change after traumatic brain injury (TBI) based on information provided by the TBI survivor and a significant other (SO), and to compare the models generated from the two different sources of information. The information obtained from the interviews with the TBI survivors and the SOs produced two models with a similar structure: three superordinate factors of personality items (affective regulation, behavioural regulation and engagement) and one superordinate factor of items relevant to mental state (restlessness and range of thought). Despite the similarity in structure, the content of the information obtained from the two interviews was different.