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Open Access research that is exploring the innovative potential of sustainable design solutions in architecture and urban planning...

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Research activity at Architecture explores a wide variety of significant research areas within architecture and the built environment. Among these is the better exploitation of innovative construction technologies and ICT to optimise 'total building performance', as well as reduce waste and environmental impact. Sustainable architectural and urban design is an important component of this. To this end, the Cluster for Research in Design and Sustainability (CRiDS) focuses its research energies towards developing resilient responses to the social, environmental and economic challenges associated with urbanism and cities, in both the developed and developing world.

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Influences of integrating touch screen smart board and CAD in collaborative design

Annamalai Vasantha, Gokula Vijayumar and Ramesh, Hari Prakash and Sugavanam, Chandra Mouli and Chakrabarti, Amaresh and Corney, Jonathan (2015) Influences of integrating touch screen smart board and CAD in collaborative design. In: ICDC 2015 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Design Creativity. The Design Society, pp. 217-224. ISBN 9781904670605

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Abstract

Although a digital design tool like CAD has a strong influence on creative design, it is merely used in the detail design stage to present the visualized final product in 3D space. Limitations in CAD have led to the great emphasis on employing supporting tools in early stages of conceptual design. This paper aims to comprehend the need for supporting tools with CAD package in the design process. To understand the role played by a supporting tool in collaborative design, six laboratory experiments involving six pairs of designers working on three different design problems were conducted in the original and redesign phases. Designers were provided with Rhinoceros® CAD design tool and a SMART Board™ Interactive Whiteboard with SMART Notebook™ software as supporting tools. A significant finding from the video protocols and captured documents analyses is that there is a strong negative correlation between frequency of transactions between these two tools and the quality of final designs generated.