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Percutaneous heart valves; past, present and future

Rozeik, MM and Wheatley, DJ and Gourlay, T (2014) Percutaneous heart valves; past, present and future. Perfusion, 29 (5). pp. 397-410. ISSN 0267-6591

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Abstract

Percutaneous heart valves provide a promising future for patients refused surgery on the grounds of significant technical challenges or high risk for complications. Since the first human intervention more than 10 years ago, over 50 different types of valves have been developed. The CoreValve and Edwards SAPIEN valves have both experienced clinical trials and the latter has gained FDA approval for implantation in patients considered inoperable. Current complications, such as major vascular bleeding and stroke, prevent these valves from being commonly deployed in patients considered operable in conventional surgery. This review focuses on the past and present achievements of these valves and highlights the design considerations required to progress development further. It is envisaged that, with continued improvement in valve design and with increased clinical and engineering experience, percutaneous heart valve replacement may one day be a viable option for lower-risk operable patients.