Picture water droplets

Developing mathematical theories of the physical world: Open Access research on fluid dynamics from Strathclyde

Strathprints makes available Open Access scholarly outputs by Strathclyde's Department of Mathematics & Statistics, where continuum mechanics and industrial mathematics is a specialism. Such research seeks to understand fluid dynamics, among many other related areas such as liquid crystals and droplet evaporation.

The Department of Mathematics & Statistics also demonstrates expertise in population modelling & epidemiology, stochastic analysis, applied analysis and scientific computing. Access world leading mathematical and statistical Open Access research!

Explore all Strathclyde Open Access research...

Susceptibility to seasickness

Bos, J.E. and Damala, D. and Lewis, C. and Ganguly, A. and Turan, O. (2007) Susceptibility to seasickness. Ergonomics, 50 (6). pp. 890-901. ISSN 0014-0139

This is the latest version of this item.

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

This paper explains part of the observed variability in passenger illness ratings aboard ships by gender, age and sickness history. Within the framework of a European project, 2840 questionnaires, gathered on several ships operating all over Europe, were analysed. Gender, age and sickness history all had a highly significant effect on seasickness. Furthermore, these effects could be characterized by two fixed parameters describing a general age effect, a third parameter dependent on sickness history and a fourth parameter dependent on gender. Female illness ratings peaked at an age of 11 years, 1.5 times as high as male ratings, which peaked at an age of 21 years. At higher ages, illness ratings decrease to only 20% of their maximum, reducing gender differences to zero. Passengers with a previous history of seasickness rated their illness about two times higher than those who had not felt sick before.

Available Versions of this Item

  • Susceptibility to seasickness. (deposited 04 Dec 2007) [Currently Displayed]