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Rapid accumulation of inositol phosphates in isolated rat superior cervical sympathetic ganglia exposed to V1-vasopressin and muscarinic cholinergic stimuli

Bone, E A and Fretten, P and Palmer, S and Kirk, C J and Michell, R H (1984) Rapid accumulation of inositol phosphates in isolated rat superior cervical sympathetic ganglia exposed to V1-vasopressin and muscarinic cholinergic stimuli. Biochemical Journal, 221 (3). pp. 803-811. ISSN 0264-6021

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Abstract

An accumulation of 3H-labelled inositol phosphates is observed when prelabelled rat superior cervical sympathetic ganglia are exposed to [8-arginine]vasopressin or to muscarinic cholinergic stimuli. The response to vasopressin is much greater than the response to cholinergic stimuli. The response to vasopressin is blocked by a V1-vasopressin antagonist, and oxytocin is a much less potent agonist than vasopressin. Vasopressin causes no increase in the cyclic AMP content of ganglia. These ganglia therefore appear to have functional V1-vasopressin receptors that are capable of activating inositol lipid breakdown, but no V2-receptors coupled to adenylate cyclase. The first [3H]inositol-labelled products to accumulate in stimulated ganglia are inositol trisphosphate and inositol bisphosphate, suggesting that the initiating reaction in stimulated inositol lipid metabolism is a phosphodiesterase-catalysed hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (and possibly also phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate). This response to exogenous vasopressin occurs in ganglia incubated in media of reduced Ca2+ concentration. The physiological functions of the V1-vasopressin receptors of these ganglia remain unknown.