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Open Access research that is exploring the innovative potential of sustainable design solutions in architecture and urban planning...

Strathprints makes available scholarly Open Access content by researchers in the Department of Architecture based within the Faculty of Engineering.

Research activity at Architecture explores a wide variety of significant research areas within architecture and the built environment. Among these is the better exploitation of innovative construction technologies and ICT to optimise 'total building performance', as well as reduce waste and environmental impact. Sustainable architectural and urban design is an important component of this. To this end, the Cluster for Research in Design and Sustainability (CRiDS) focuses its research energies towards developing resilient responses to the social, environmental and economic challenges associated with urbanism and cities, in both the developed and developing world.

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Bridging the Boundaries : Human Experience in the Natural and Built Environment and Implications for Research, Policy and Practice

Edgerton, Edward and Romice, Ombretta and Thwaites, Kevin (2014) Bridging the Boundaries : Human Experience in the Natural and Built Environment and Implications for Research, Policy and Practice. Advances in People-Environment Studies . Hogrefe. ISBN 9780889374669

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Abstract

This volume outlines current interdisciplinary research on the reciprocal relations between humans and the built and natural environments. The expert contributors investigate topics such as environmental impact on health and well-being, identity and place attachment, urban sustainability, and challenges linked to global or national environmental phenomena. Some chapters reflect on theoretical contributions that offer alternative ways of thinking about human–environment interactions, while others focus on methodological challenges and innovations. The quality and interdisciplinary diversity of the chapters make the book a unique contribution to understanding present and future human–environment challenges at all scales and in all global contexts. It will be valuable to researchers, practitioners, and policy makers across a range of related disciplines, including psychology, architecture, urban design and planning, education, sociology, human and social ecology, interior design, and geography.