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Open Access research with a European policy impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the European Policies Research Centre (EPRC).

EPRC is a leading institute in Europe for comparative research on public policy, with a particular focus on regional development policies. Spanning 30 European countries, EPRC research programmes have a strong emphasis on applied research and knowledge exchange, including the provision of policy advice to EU institutions and national and sub-national government authorities throughout Europe.

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The influence of different dressings on the pH of the wound environment

Milne, Stephen D and Connolly, Patricia (2014) The influence of different dressings on the pH of the wound environment. Journal of Wound Care, 23 (2). 53 - 57. ISSN 0969-0700

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Abstract

This study examines the effect of various wound dressings on the pH levels of a wound, using a simulated wound environment. The pH levels of a 4 different wound dressings (manuka honey dressing, sodium carboxymethylcellulose hydrofiber dressing, polyhydrated ionogen-coated polymer mesh dressing, and a protease modulating collagen cellulose dressing) were tested in a simulated horse serum wound environment. The effect of local buffering was observed and pH changes in real time were measured. All dressings were found to have low pH (below pH 4), with the lowest being the protease modulating collage cellulose dressing, with a pH of 2.3. The dressing with the strongest acid concentration was the polyhydrated, ionogen-coated, polymer mesh dressing. The low pH and strong acidic nature of the dressing investigated indicate that they may play a role in influencing the healing process in a wound.