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Eudistomins W and X, two new beta-carbolines from the micronesian tunicate Eudistoma sp.

Schupp, Peter and Poehner, Timo and Edrada-Ebel, Ruangelie and Ebel, Rainer and Berg, Albrecht and Wray, Victor and Proksch, Peter (2003) Eudistomins W and X, two new beta-carbolines from the micronesian tunicate Eudistoma sp. Journal of Natural Products, 66 (2). pp. 272-275. ISSN 0163-3864

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Abstract

Chemical investigation of the Micronesian ascidian Eudistoma sp. afforded two new eudistomin congeners, which were designated eudistomins W (1) and X (2). The structures of the new compounds were unambiguously established on the basis of NMR spectroscopic ((1)H, (13)C, COSY, (1)H detected direct, and long-range (13)C-(1)H correlations) and mass spectrometric (EI and ESIMS) data. Compound 2 exhibited antibiotic activity toward Bacillus subtilis, Staphyloccocus aureus, and Escherichia coli and was also found to be fungicidal against Candida albicans in an agar diffusion assay. Compound 1 was selectively active against C. albicans but showed no antibacterial activity.